• Rediscovering Ourselves Through the Game

    April 19, 2017. Community Impact Coach, Panchi, writes about experience working with Futbol Mas in Antofagasta, Chile. Translated by volunteer, Nico.

    From the experience that I lived with CAC and as a participant in the games, I see that both organizations have a similar focus with respect to the form of learning that they aim to create, and how the new spaces and going out of your comfort zone allows you to develop. Putting learning aside discovering, challenging yourself, valuing your experiences, delivering an opportunity that encourages adventure while at the same time gives you the confidence in your own capacities to face the obstacles that are presented in the way, is incredible. Most importantly, we treat the obstacles and mistakes as the most treasured piece within the adventure. We speak the same language, the same things move us and even if it sounds cliché, we believe that we can build a better world. That allowed my experience to be so enriching. Being able to take everything new to contribute to what we want to achieve with our intervention, makes everything meaningful.

    I consider that the CAC work way allows one to discover how to coach from one’s own abilities, as well as use appropriate methodology to form and create from that a space. At the beginning I was happily thinking about what was the right way, how should I do it, and what were the structure and steps, since I thought there was only one way to do it. After observing the dynamics that occurred in classes, the different alternatives and creations that the participants themselves proposed, I realized that the ways in which a coach can carry an activity are infinite and valuable.

    The workshops in Antofagasta were incredible, it surprised me that in front of the same stimulus, as a game, the dynamics during the game and the reflection later may be so different from what we experienced in Santiago. The variants that the same group of participants proposed and the reflections and thoughts that were shared in the space configured a unique experience that belongs to that particular human group, which I consider a simply wonderful part of CAC. The sport and game are really deep and wise tools, which despite being present daily in what we do at Futbol Mas will never fail to surprise me. The emotional climate they generate, how they invite to participate and feel comfortable with people they just met is great. They did so in a way that was ridiculous, laughing and looking at us, with the same freedom with which children do.

    Each game has a purpose, a sense, and some space to add variants and invite participants to create, allowing immediately for a horizontal relationship. If a proposed variant does not work, it is taken as an opportunity to analyze and ask questions and thus build deeper learning.

    Within the session there are some questions that can guide participants about where we want to reach with that conversation, which does not mean that there are correct or incorrect answers but there is merely a space where we can create questions. I love the flexibility of proposals, their simplicity and depth, less was more this week.

    Many times as adults and professionals we can identify different human and social issues that we consider so important as to talk and put on the table, such as gender equity, sexual health and immigration among other things. As tutors, we have the mission of creating spaces of discussion, of questioning, to know what they think, and to invite them to have a conscious understanding in front of the reality of the context. Both with the children we work with and with their communities this is important. Many times we do not find the ways that invite participation, we feel uncomfortable for what it costs us to generate a space where others feel comfortable, with the confidence to participate and share their thoughts, where everyone respects each other’s opinion. We aimed to generate a healthy discussion space. That is one of the things I learned with CAC, through concrete activities and games we can open the space to deepen the contingency due to the program’s richness in symbolism and metaphors.

     

  • Hello Santiago

    April 11, 2017. Community Impact Coach Nico Fuchs-Lynch writes about working with Fútbol Más in Santiago, Chile.

    Stepping into the Fútbol Más office in the heart of Santiago on Monday, I was immediately impressed by how well organized this partner was. Moreover, the enthusiasm that all of Fútbol Más brought to everything stood out to me right from that first day and did not let up throughout the week. At our first training session in Peñon, they proved that they are innovative and thoughtful coaches, never hesitating to modify games and always thinking of ways to connect the games to prominent social issues in Santiago. They truly made the sessions for them, not just learning CAC games and techniques, but incorporating and modifying them into their own methodology that they will use for many years to come.

    The next day, our session was in a park close to the Fútbol Más headquarters and one game was very useful for the Chilean coaches. That game was condom tag, a version of tag that simulates how HIV can affect a community extremely fast. The incorporation of safe zones and condoms as protection from HIV further showed participants how they could use this game to teach about sexual safety in their coaching. Many participants were fans of this game because they realized that sexual safety is a major issue in Santiago and games such as condom tag were ways they could raise awareness about these issues. After our training session, we had the pleasure of watching the Chile-Venezuela World Cup qualifier with Fútbol Más. 4 minutes into the match, Chile scored and cries of “Viva Chile!” filled the restaurant. A 3-1 Chile victory and delicious sandwiches left spirits high for the next day’s session.

    On Wednesday, we gave a talk on Self-Directed Learning. Many ideas were brought up about how to best empower kids to learn and create an educational system that puts kids and teachers at an equal level. Later that day, our session was located in a gymnasium in Maipu. Many local university students joined us, as well as the director of Fútbol Más himself. We played games relating to teamwork, creativity, and the power of negative influences. The director running like a cowboy in Circle of Friends is a memory I will never forget. On our way back from the session, we were introduced to a tasty Chilean snack, sopapillas. Eating these delicious fried pastries in front of the metro station was a perfect end to our day in Maipu.

    Thursday’s session was held at the stadium in Maipu. Despite the fire that was smoking in the distance, we discussed gender stereotypes and identity. Participants modified games, living up to the ideas they brought forth during the SDL talk the day before. After the training, we had an exciting 5v5 game with participants. One of these participants happened to be the captain for the Chilean National Dwarf team!

    On Friday, we returned to the same neighborhood where we began the session, in Peñon. Fútbol Más coaches shared some of the games they learned over the course of the week, adding in their own variations and describing the social impact behind the games. One coach did such a good job during her Coachback that she was invited to coach as a CIC during next week’s session in Antofogasta. It was a great ending to a week filled with great food and soccer in one of the coolest cities out there, Santiago!

     

  • The Great Chamwino

    December 12, 2014. Volunteer Coach from Germany, Frederick Schwarzmaier, joins fellow countryman Markus Bensch as well as Kelly Conheeney in Tanzania. He writes about his first experience On-Field with CAC in Chamwino. 

    Before any coaching session could start on Monday morning, we visited the District Executive Director of Chamwino, a highly respected woman. After introducing ourselves, Markus took a few minutes to talk about Coaches Across Continents as an organization and our approach in this community. As expected, she gave her consent for the program and we headed towards the local soccer pitch on motorbike-taxis with great anticipation and a box of new footballs. At arrival, reality quickly tempered us as only eight coaches showed up. Nico, the Community Impact Coach of Chamwino and an amazing go-to person, confirmed that eight would be our total number for the day. Given the low number of participants, we decided to play a fun game of soccer and start with the program on Tuesday. Afterwards, we went to meet the Chairman of Chamwino in order to introduce ourselves and explain what we are going to do in the next few days in his district. For us, this meeting was very worthwhile because the Chairman introduced us to the history of Chamwino as well as Tanzania, including a proudly presented story about the nation’s first president, Julius Nyerere, who visited Chamwino on several occasions. In order to make it a successful day over all, we coached over 40 girls from a local secondary school several CAC games including Ronaldo Skills for Life, Mingle Mingle and Pairs Soccer. The girls were visibly proud that their male fellow pupils were all along gazing at them while practicing their new soccer skills.

    Gratefully, on Tuesday twelve coaches showed up, hence, we decided to begin the program. Although, the number of participants was low, we had a very intense but fun week. As there were some returning coaches from previous years, they occasionally stepped in to teach their new peers certain games or moves on their own. This also showed us the impact of our program in this community on former participants. Besides, we set the focus on Child Rights and Gender Equality as this was requested by the community and regarded as one of their biggest current challenges. This issue especially arose when we were having a discussion about the rights of a child, as this is done within every CAC program and every community. Nearly half of the participants justified hitting their pupils or other children if they weren’t paying attention in class. An additional issue was the local coaches’ cheating manner. It took several attempts to announce fairly played winners in many of the conflict games, as it seemed that they cheat out of instinct. I felt as though this challenge was successfully tackled by us in a fun learning environment. Especially for me as a newbie at CAC, these circumstances made me contemplate the local culture. I tried to slip into the coaches’ shoes in the hope that I would find the root cause to their behavior. My explanation – you could also name it presumption as I do not have a scientific proof of it – for it is that they treat their children the same way as they were treated when they were young. Having this in mind while during our program in Chamwino, I was putting myself under too much pressure in order to transform the whole community into a better place and flood it with my ideas for improvement. I quickly realized that this approach is not working out and I should rather ask questions instead of giving possible answers as the CAC curriculum suggests. This method simply proofed to me the power and sustainability of the CAC approach. Combined with the uniting power of football, this program is even more amazing than I could have ever imagined before experiencing it myself. Besides, it is not only the local coaches but also me who are learning a lot.

    On Thursday, the local coaches taught the children the CAC games they learned this week. This was a great success as one could witness the drive and joy the coaches spread during their short and individual sessions with the kids. Their attitude created a setting where children could learn, laugh, play and fail without being afraid of consequences, no matter if girl or boy. Solely, one could criticize their urge to solve little problems for the children instead of letting them gain some problem solving experience themselves, e.g. fixing the human circle when playing Circle of Friends. Overall, it was fantastic seeing them teaching the kids.

    On Friday, after the last session of the program, we handed over the certificates to each participant that turned out to be more like a closing ceremony than a simple duty. Before we handed out the certificates, a representative of the local Education Office was the guest of honor and delivered a speech about the importance of implementing the CAC games in the learning curriculum of each school. After the ceremony, the participants surprised each of us with a shirt of Tanzania’s national soccer team – a great ending of a tiring but joyful week. Shortly afterwards, under pouring rain, we headed to Dodoma City to prepare for the upcoming program.

    To put it in a nutshell, although struggling at the beginning of the week to get a sufficient number of local coaches for this year’s program in Chamwino, the week turned out to be a great success for all of us. We are confident we have made a sustainable impact on Chamwino’s community.

     

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  • Setting the Standard in Tanzania

    Dr. Fenera Mkangara and Liz Lloyd officially launch the GOAL program in Tanzania

    Dr. Fenera Mkangara and Standard Chartered CEO Liz Lloyd officially launch the GOAL program in Tanzania

    July 19, 2013.  Yesterday marked the official launch of the GOAL program in Tanzania.  Sponsored by Standard Chartered Bank, the launch of GOAL Tanzania was a tremendous spectacle with impressive entertainment and highlighted by the speech from the honorable Dr. Fenera Mkangara, the Tanzanian Minster of Information Youth, Culture, and Sport.  Introduced by Liz Lloyd, the CEO of Standard Chartered Tanzania, Dr. Fenera Mkangara spoke to the hundreds of school children and assembled media about the importance of the GOAL program for Tanzania.  She stressed the importance and need to increase the participation of girls in sport, and that, “sports is a strong linkage and important in raising children and the development of the nation at large and can improve child health and develop their studies.”

    Championed by Standard Chartered, the GOAL program teaches young boys and girls social lessons through football-based games over four main modules: Be Healthy, Be Empowered, Be Yourself, and Be Money Savvy.  Earlier in the week 64 teachers, coaches and Standard Chartered employees from the Dar es Salaam area went through an intensive training program to learn and be able to teach twenty GOAL games.  They will now implement these games with boys and girls in their respective schools who are aged 9-14.  The impact in Dar es Salaam alone is expected to approach 10,000 students.

    A snake performer was part of the festivities during the ceremony

    A snake performer was part of the days festivities!

    The launch moment came after a fun-filled day that included a DJ, dancers, a contortionist, a performer with a 15-foot snake, stilt-walkers, and a short demonstration of one of the GOAL games which included participation by Dr. Mkangara, Ms. Lloyd, and Rehema Tunzo the Headmistress of Zanaki Secondary School where the festivities took place.  Shortly thereafter the trio walked down the red carpet to cut a ceremonial ribbon under a shower of confetti to mark this monumental moment.  Make sure to check out our facebook page to see albums from both the Launch Day and the Teachers Training.

    The CAC team of Brian Suskiewicz and Tanzanian Community Impact Coach Nicolaus Achimpota now head to Arusha and Mwanza to train even more teachers in this valuable program.

    Teachers and coaches pose alongside the guests of honor with their certificates.

    Teachers and coaches pose alongside the guests of honor with their certificates.