• The Power of Acronyms

    May 16th, 2018. Coaches Across Continents Facilitator, Ashlyn Hardie, puts together a blog reflecting the incredible leadership and success of Community Impact Coach (CIC), Benny Marquis, and past Michael Johnson Young Leader, Jamie Tomkinson who recently lead a Coaches Across Continents training in Bangalore, India with CAC partner Parikrma Humanity Foundation.

    Stories like these are amazing. They are amazing because everything that Coaches Across Continents strives for is positive social change in the world – and not just for a moment, for a minute, for a year – but forever. Sustainable, positive change is why we do everything that we do here at CAC.

    So, why is this program so special? Why is this blog titled “The Power of Acronyms”? Let me explain….

    FIRST – Jamie Tomkinson was nominated by Coaches Across Continents to be a Michael Johnson Young Leader a couple years ago, and was selected! MJYL, our first acronym for this blog, is one of the most prestigious leadership training courses, and life-changing opportunities for young people all around the world. Jamie, once finishing the MJYL training, has continued to work with Coaches Across Continents (CAC – this one you should know) on multiple on-field programs over the past two years.

    NOW – Benny Marquis has been a CAC program participant in the past, but was just recently promoted to being a CAC Community Impact Coach! The CIC Initiative is designed by CAC to take stand out participants from our programs and further develop them with the Online Education Program (OEP) and On-Field professional development opportunities!

    AMAZING – So, back to sustainability. A couple of years ago CAC, nominated a kid to give him a chance for the MJYL program, and he thrived! He continued to travel, coach, and learn and has recently ran his own program, independently representing CAC with partner Parikrma, in Bangalore, India. Assisting him with this training is CIC, Benny, who is now able to apply all of his learnings from the OEP program on the ground. Not only this, but Jamie has connected CAC Partner Parikrma with his old sporting club, Spartans Academy, and they will be hosting a Girls Football Festival at the end of the month – so the good work keeps on going!

    Change is possible, and sustainable. People can make a difference, and their impact can grow. This story started with a teenage boy with a good heart, and now he is training community leaders around the world for the planets largest international sport for development non-profit.  This is what Coaches Across Continents is all about … ACRONYMS …. and sustainable development at its finest.

     

    Notes from Benny on the week: 

    “I learned a lot of leadership skills thanks to CAC and Jamie. I also learned how to modify the session in case of a larger group of students, and also how to use available resources – even if it is just a stone lying around – to conduct the session. Tough this was explained during the OEP in theory, I got my first hand experience at it this time on-field. I also got to learn more about two hour sessions, the number of games that can be included, and the kind of sport for education discussions that can be had.”

     

  • The Beauty of Sindhupalchok

    December 16th 2016. Dylan Pritchard blogs from Sindhupalchok, Nepal where we work with Childreach Nepal.

    In my last week with Coaches Across Continents, Mark, Tejas, and I were with Prateek and Shamsher of Childreach Nepal along with Pema who is a leader on the Michael Johnson Young Leader course in Manekharka, Sindapalchuk. Manekharka is a small village that is only five hundred meters long in the foothills of the Himalayan Mountain Range. It took us three different jeeps to get us there from Kathmandu in six hours. For only about thirty minutes of that six-hour drive were we on paved roads. The rest of the time we were driving up and down mountains on rocky dirt roads. It was a rough ride to get there but once we got there it was absolutely worth it. The beauty of the place stunned Mark, Tejas, and me. Manekharka is at the top of a foothill so you can look down and see a beautiful valley filled with terrace style farming. When you look up you can see some more beautiful foothills and can even see some peaks of the Himalayas. On the first morning Mark and I decided to hike to the top of the mountain we were on so we could get a better look at the peaks of the Himalayas. It was super tiring but we made it and snapped some awesome photos before we realized that we could possibly be late to our first training session. We booked it down the trail and ended up about half a mile away from the tin house we were staying at with only ten minutes to spare! We had to get some directions from some little girls, jump down some farming terraces, and jog but we made it because all the coaches and players came an hour late. So we had breakfast, got dressed, and made the five-minute walk to the training field.

    The setting for the field was stunning. It was not a very nice pitch but it was nestled on a terrace in the mountain and was surrounded by houses and animals with the Himalayas in the background. Only pictures can do any of the views I am talking about justice. This week’s program was set up the same way as last week in Bhaktapur except the players were older. It was an awesome week and I finally felt that I actually made a difference with my coaching. I worked on all of the points I have received from the coaches I have encountered on this trip and it culminated with this week. This week I taught all of the skill games that are modeled after famous football players. The way these games work is you do three different skills over the course of the drill and while you do the skill you must say what skill that is, such as “Ronaldo 1!” The drill works on soccer skills but it encourages the player to become more comfortable with their voice. Later on they then have the chance to choose what skill they want to do which reinforces the Self-Directed Learning part of CAC because they now make the decision on what skill to do instead of the coaches. What made me happy was that in the player’s spare time in between drills and during water breaks they were doing the skills and saying the skill aloud like I coached them. This is a reflection of their eagerness to learn and play football but it made me giddy inside knowing that I aided in the process of sustaining CAC curriculum past the time I leave. This was the first instant I felt the affect of coaching and it will definitely not be my last. During this past five weeks it has helped me realize that football must always be part of my life and coaching would be a great way to do that whether it be part time or full time.

    I have had an awesome time this past five weeks learning about football for social impact and I would like to take this time to thank Coaches Across Continents for giving me this opportunity. They say on their website that you will not understand what football for social impact is until you go on a trip and I cannot agree more. The experience I have had learning about different cultures through soccer has been one of the best of my life so far. I owe a special thank you to Mark for putting up with me for five weeks but also teaching me so much about coaching, being a leader, life, and myself. The concepts I have learned from you on this trip will serve me for the rest of my life. Thank you again Coaches Across Continents for this experience and hopefully I get a chance to work with you again in the future.

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  • Soccer As A Vehicle For Learning

    November 22nd 2016. Discussing our first ever program with the Parikrma Foundation in Bangalore, India.

    This is my second week with Coaches Across Continents and we were in Bangalore, Karnataka, India with the Parikrma Foundation. It is an awesome foundation that takes marginalized children and puts them in a school in order to give them more opportunities when they get older. They have four different schools. Their program runs from kindergarten to twelfth grade and is much more than just schooling. They feed the children breakfast, lunch, and a protein shake and they have an awesome physical education program at all four of the schools. Then after school they have great sports programs for football, taekwondo, and athletics. Both in the classroom and out of the classroom they teach the children about the social issues they face and how to overcome them through Self-Directed Learning. The Parikrma Foundation gives these marginalized children a platform to fully express themselves both in the classroom and out of the classroom.

    We started the week off with Mark, Brian, and I. When we got to the volunteer house that we were staying at on Saturday, 12 November, we met up with Jamie Tomkinson, a talented coach based in Scotland from Michael Johnson’s Young Leaders Program. Monday and Tuesday a Community Impact Coach named Tejas from his own organization, Sparky Football, came to the training session to add a local presence to our staff. Then Wednesday night Fatma Ahmed came who is based in Tanzania and is also from Michael Johnson’s Young Leaders Programme. She was a woman of few words during the camp but conveyed some of the most impactful messages during the week. Finally, Nora from CAC joined us on Wednesday night and added another female presence amongst an entirely male dominated camp. It was a very diverse group from different cultures and different backgrounds that came together to make an awesome staff for the week with the Parikrma Foundation. It was also very nice to spend some time and learn from Brian who is a very seasoned teacher/coach and is also a Boston College Soccer Alumni like myself. It was a tremendous group to be apart of where I learned something from each person.

    This week I did a little bit more coaching than the past week in Rurka Kalan. It was easier to coach with the CAC staff giving me feedback and especially with the coaches from Parikrma that we coached being so in tune with the curriculum we wanted to teach. The Parikrma Foundation teaches a curriculum that is very similar to ours, which is Self-Directed Learning inside and outside the classroom. The only reason I saw that Parikrma needed our help was with their coaches implementing the Self-Directed Learning of social issues on the field. That was so easy though because they already understood the social issues but just needed our assistance in showing how to apply the social issues through sport. It also helped that they were talented soccer players themselves so it made the training sessions run very smoothly. Overall, it was a very good week because we were able to get Parikrma to understand the CAC curriculum and I was able to further better my coaching through the feedback I got from the players, the Michael Johnson Young Leaders, and CAC staff.

    During the week there was an exact moment where the participants realized that they could use the curriculum not only to raise awareness about social issues to their kids but to also produce a good football training session. It was on Wednesday during the Child Rights game. It is a keep away game with two teams but there is a box in each corner of the grid that you play the game in. Each corner represents any different right that children should have. Examples are right to education, right to healthcare, right to security, right to health and wellness, and many more. When your team passes to a recipient in one of the boxes they must yell a right that children should have. When you enter each square your team gets a point. When we played the game it started very slow. When we made the soccer points of spreading out, using the whole field, and switching the point of attack quickly, that is when the game started to flow and the ball was zipping around. Now each team was hitting each square a couple of times and yelling a right that children should have. They were having fun and when we brought them in to talk about the social learning you could see that they now understood the CAC curriculum. They were answering the Self-Directed Learning questions about child rights with ease and understood what they needed to do to convey this to their own children. We know that this is the moment they got the message because when we had a participant coach it back to us they hit each and every point they needed to while having the game flow. They now understood that soccer is just the vehicle in which to make their own players understand the social issues that surround them in their communities.

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