• A Glimpse at the Future

    Friday, August 7, 2015. The Malaika Foundation in the Democratic Republic of Congo is the first program partnership for our new ASK for Choice curriculum for female empowerment.

    Every day this week we had local street children watching our trainings at the FIFA Football for Hope Center in Kalebuka, DRC. This is not unusual. However one young girl caught our attention. Not more than five or six herself, she was carrying her infant brother on her back the duration of the week as she intently watched our trainings. She was the caretaker of her infant brother despite being a young child herself. But what was happening On-Field during the week will begin to address cultural change for the future in terms of gender equity and community responsibility. The Malaika Foundation is our first ASK for Choice Partnership and will be using sport to bring gender policies to life in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    The interest in our ASK for Choice partnership was tremendous from the Malaika Foundation which is led by Noella Coursaris. Both the total overall attendance and the female attendance were the highest achieved for any program in CAC’s history. 238 coaches participated in our training, with 140 of the participants being women. Together the men and women learned from our ASK for Choice curriculum.   ASK for Choice aims to use sport to bring gender policies to life.

    Based on comprehensive research, thorough M&E and 25 years of experience, CAC has developed ASK for Choice which aims to enhance the Attitudes, Skills and Knowledge of women and their communities to educate them to be drivers of change. ASK for Choice will strengthen the roles of women in sport and society and create a generation of leaders with community responsibility.

    As an ASK for Choice Center, the Malaika Foundation is expected to work with CAC and deliver measurable results. ASK for Choice will increase partners’ capacity to bring about sustainable, tangible change with regard to gender equality and women’s rights. Along with our program this year, we also were able to meet with Thérèse Lukenge, the Minister of Sport in Katanga Province. Alongside the government, we will be working together to bring gender policies to life in Katanga Province.

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  • Partnership with Peace One Day A Huge Success

    October 17, 2014.  Earlier this year Coaches Across Continents announced the largest partnership in sport for social impact.  Together with Peace One Day, we teamed up to supply organizations with a free soccer resource packet that uses CAC games to educate about peace and encourage the development of skill sets that lead to peace building.  On 21 September, these efforts came to the fruition when millions around the world celebrated and recognized Peace Day.

    Together with Peace One Day, Coaches Across Continents is using their One Day One Goal platform to use football as a peace building educational exercise.  Along with their other efforts, the goal for 2014 is to have Peace Day recognized by one billion people globally.  This first year of our partnership was a great start to spreading that awareness.  Overall nearly four hundred sport for social development organizations took advantage of this free resource to educate their communities on peace building practices.  These included organizations on all six continents, and they were distributed and available in six different languages (English, German, French, Spanish, Portuguese, and Swahili).

    The focus of this year’s celebrations was on the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Great Lakes region of Africa (focusing on Burundi, Uganda, Rwanda, and Tanzania).  So far in those five countries we have confirmation of the resource packet being used by 50 organizations to promote peace, with more coming forward every day.  Each of these organizations also held an event for 21 September, the International Day of Peace.  These include CAC implementing community partners as well as organizations who have heard about the power of sport through other avenues like StreetFootballWorld, One World Futbol, FIFA Football for Hope, and Peace One Day.

    Stories, pictures, and videos from around the world continue to arrive speaking of the incredible power that football has as a unifying factor.  Check out some of them on our Facebook page.  If you or your organization want to tell your story from Peace Day, please contact us at: or

    Celebrating Peace in Goma, Congo

    Celebrating Peace in Goma, Congo

    Celebrating Peace in Diadema, Brazil

    Celebrating Peace in Diadema, Brazil

    Celebrating Peace in Kenya

    Celebrating Peace in Kenya

     

     

  • DRC Launch Our Peace Day Football Resource Packet

    July 25, 2014.  On Monday Coaches Across Continents announced the largest-ever sport for social impact partnership and released a free football resource packet in the build up for One Day One Goal on Peace Day, 21 September.  Already over 100 organizations worldwide have requested and received this football resource packet.  Within our first week, one group, the Georges Malaika Foundation in Kalebuka, DRC, have had 65 coaches play the Peace Day games during their training with CAC.

    The Peace Day games are fun. They help us with some skills such as speed, fitness, quick movements and they have a social message. For example teamwork, respect and telling everyone that men and women have the same opportunities. – Elvis Nshimba, Teacher, Georges Malaika Foundation

    By 21 September, Coaches Across Continents and Peace One Day expect these specially-developed games will be played in over 130 countries, by thousands of communities, impacting hundreds of thousands of children and coaches.
    The important Peace Day messages such as violence in the community and understanding stereotypes are clear through the training. Technically, we have learnt passing and control in the games along with the strategy of football. All the coaches had a lot of fun and appreciated the training which has changed their way of thinking about their role in the community.
    – Jerome Ilunga, Sports Manager, Georges Malaika Foundation
    To get involved and receive your free Football Resource Packet for your organization, please email Emily at
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  • Kampala: Intercultural Understanding

    April 15, 2014. In our 2nd week in Uganda Nora and I [Markus] faced totally different circumstances than in Mbarara, on-field and off-field. We arrived in Kampala on Sunday afternoon and got accommodated in a hotel right next to the US embassy, so we felt safe 🙂 The hotel was simple, but very nice. After one week without running water and a “western” toilet the shower we both took immediately after we arrived felt like a Christmas gift.P1030270

    In Kampala we cooperate with “Soccer Without Borders” (SWB), an organization that is serving and educating the refugees who live in Kampala and come from all different countries surrounding Uganda. Uganda functions very much like a melting pot for all the people who try to start a new life far away from their war torn home countries. So we worked with coaches from Rwanda, Democratic Republic of Congo and Uganda and faced a multicultural setting on the field. Due to these circumstances we needed to translate our games always into a French-Swahili mixture to make them understandable to everybody. But differences in ethnicity don’t cause social exclusion. We experienced a very inclusive atmosphere where people are practicing intercultural understanding day by day.

    The coaches responded very well to the Skills for Life games and were excited to practice Ronaldo, Marta and Balotelli skills every day. These activities improve the football skills of the players as well as encourage them to concentrate, communicate and raise awareness for their surroundings. During our sessions we worked also on HIV/AIDS awareness and played “Condom tag”. It’s a simple tag game where the player with the cone represents the HIV-Virus and everybody he/she tags is “infected” with HIV. During the game the rules get adapted and some players represent condoms where the others can rescue themselves from the taggers by standing next to them. That is one of our games that help to start a conversation about good decisions that help us to stay healthy and protect ourselves from getting HIV. After we played some HIV/AIDS education games the participants mentioned the importance of this topic and we had a very fruitful conversation.

    P1030282I coached this week for the first time 95% football. It went very well and the coaches understood my explanation very quickly. This game doesn’t need a ball. The ball is represented by the player who has his/her hand on their head. The ball can be passed on by shouting the name of a teammate and removing the hand off the head. The other player puts his hand on the head and can score by running through the goal. The ball can be taken away from the possessing team by tagging the player with the ball. The coaches enjoyed this game very much and I was impressed by the fairness of the two teams. Usually the rules have to be adapted, because one or both teams are either positioning their strikers or defenders rights in front of the goal line which makes scoring impossible. Not so much with these teams. 95% football is a brilliant tool to make the players understand that football is 95% smart thinking, quick decision making and constant readiness and only 5% skill on the ball.

    On Thursday we had our Child Protection Policy session which caused some very good discussions about different forms of child abuse that are present in this community. For us this time of the week is very important, because children are suffering abuse from their coaches all over the world and children are the most vulnerable members of our society. The awareness of the coaches about the importance of protecting the children rights impressed us. We spoke about one case in particular where one coach asked if it is the girls fault when she got raped after she was dressed up in a mini skirt and sitting with opened legs. In the following discussions we pointed out in the group very clearly that it is never the girl’s fault and that it is the duty of us adults to educate our youth about potential risks and consequences of our behavior.P1030337

    Friday is usually our coach back day. We didn’t have one last week in Mbarara, because we only had four days due to weather. So it was my first time experiencing how coaches that we worked with for a week adapt and teach CAC games. At the same time it gives us coaches the opportunity to slip into the role of a participant. We get the coaches together in groups of two or three and started with a very creative adaption of “Circle of friends”. We experienced some very advanced versions of Skills for Life games as well as a brilliant adaption of “Adebayor Makes Good Choices”. We hope that all the coaches keep up their good work and be as creative in their daily work as they have been when they were adapting CAC games. We thank SWB for their wonderful hospitality and cooperation and wish them all the best for their future work that their devoted service may help many refugees in Nsambya to find hope and develop their future in a foreign country far away from home.

     

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