• Chile, Cuatro Ciudades

    April 27, 2018. Community Impact Coach Lina reflects on her on-field weeks working with CAC partner Futbol Mas in Chile, alongside the rest of the CAC team.

    Iquique, Copiapó, Santiago y Concepción

    Durante esta experiencia de dos semanas, puedo decir que tuvimos (Nora, Abby y yo) el privilegio de compartir con personas maravillosas de diferentes ciudades de Chile. En cada desplazamiento se observaba los contrastes en sus paisajes, las dunas, el mar, lo árido, lo verde, las montañas, el frio, el calor y esto se reflejó en la fuerza de su gente con el “exceso de pasión” para cada momento.

    Durante las dos semanas pudimos trascender el deporte más allá de la alta competencia (Ganar/Perder), a través de juegos direccionados a temas de impacto social: inclusión, equidad, respeto al otro, interculturalidad, derechos humanos, educación sexual y medio ambiente. Al compartir metodologías se nos pueden abrir oportunidades para ampliar nuestra comprensión.

    Gracias por hacerlo posible, CAC, Ask for Choice, Fútbol Más e Inder Medellín.

     

    Chile, four cities: Iquique, Copiapó, Santiago y Concepción. 
    During this experience of two weeks, I can say that we (Nora, Abby and I) had the privilege of sharing with amazing people from different cities in Chile. At every move you could see the contrasts in the landscape, the dunes, the sea, the desert, the green, the mountains, the cold, the heat and this was reflected in the strength of the people with their ‘excess of passion’ for every moment.
    During the two weeks we were able to transcend the highly competitive nature of sport (Winning/Losing), through games directed at themes of social impact: inclusion, equity, respect for others, interculturality, human rights, sexual education and the environment. Sharing methodologies allows us to open opportunities to amplify our comprehension. Thank you for making this possible, CAC, ASK for Choice, Fútbol Más and Inder Medellín.
  • Reducing Teen Pregnancy through Soccer

    On December 22nd, 2017. Community Impact Coach, Nicholaus Achimpota, from Tanzania writes about running a CAC program in Kigoma, alone. Nico is pictured above from another training he helped run in Pemba, Zanzibar. 

    My name is Nicholaus Achimpota. I have a Bachelor of Sports Science and Management at Ndejje University in Uganda. I have worked with CAC since 2008. In the last 10 years I have worked with the government as a sports officer in Kigoma, and for 3 years as the Chamwino district update.

    My job is training and monitoring the sports teachers, conducting workshops and seminars to club leaders, acting as the assistant registrar of the sports association and clubs planning yearly sports programs in my district. I work with 120 primary schools and 28 secondary schools.

    This week it was my first time to run the CAC program alone. It was not easy to believe that CAC would trust me to run the program in country, completely alone, without the leader from CAC staff – but they did!

    I was very happy to have this opportunity and I want to say thank you to all of the CAC staff for giving me this work. This means that I opened the door for other CAC members to work in their communities without the direct on-field overseeing of CAC.

    In the first day the participants didn’t believe what happened. During the introduction for the Sports Officer, Mr. Abdul, everyone was surprised that the program was being ran by me (Nicholaus) because the last year was ran by CAC’s Emily from America.

    At the end of the first day one of the coaches, Anastasia Busumabi, came to me and she said “Coach Nico, we understood the way you taught and how to use soccer to teach social issues. Because of the language barriers, we have feared to ask questions in previous years.” Another teacher Singo said “By bringing you here, it means even us we can do the same as you”. Which is the purpose of the Community Impact Coach program – to empower coaches to be leaders and role models for other coaches in their communities.

    The five-day program was based on how to use CAC games to prevent social issues specifically teenage pregnancy. So, we emphasized the games for conflict prevention, skills for life, HIV and gender equality.

    The participants impressed me, and motivated me to do all the best to make sure they understood how to use soccer to teach social issues to the community.

    It was very fun after four years to be back again to Kigoma and enjoy the nice food that they had to offer. Migebuka is the type of fish available at Lake Tanganyika and was my favorite during my stay. On Thursday afternoon I helped the teachers learn how to play Woodball.

    To be honest it was a great experience for me to learn and share skills with teachers in my country. Moreover, I never forgot to sing with them the song “Amatosa” and different concentration games. Nothing is impossible under the sun. It is important that all communities benefit with the CAC saying “Smile and solve your problem”.

    I am the first Community Impact Coach to run a program alone in Kigoma.

    Many more will follow the way. Goodbye Kigoma.

  • Gender: Zooming in and out as We Search for Equality

    May 5, 2017. Nora Dooley shares thoughts after her visit with long-time partners ACER Brasil in Diadema for the fifth year of programming and first year of ASK for Choice.

     

    What does it mean to be a man? To do something ‘like a man’? To be ‘masculine’?
    What about a woman? Female? Feminine?

    As the lines between genders blur and we begin to understand the origins of these identities, we become better equipped to recognize, question, and challenge expectations, norms, traditions, and cultures that limit us – whoever we are, whatever we call ourselves.

    But…

    While the smashing of labels and boxes that contain us sends a powerful message to any who dare assume our strengths, abilities, and vulnerabilities – our wants, needs, and fears – solely based on what body we are born to… can those same labels serve a collective, more equal future? And if we use those labels to empower us – to put language to injustice and call out oppressing forces – how do we strike the balance between the ideal and the real? How do we walk and breathe equality in a vastly unequal reality?

    These are some of the complex questions we explored on the futsal court last week in Diadema where we have worked for several years with our partners, ACER Brasil.

    Through almost 50 different games and activities we moved together as a group of humans, each with our own individual experiences and visions, towards a tangible, practical, and sustainable goal. We navigated the existing issues and climates that contribute to the realities people in Brazil (and the rest of the world!) are faced with each day, and emerged through this complicated, sometimes blinding, fog with a fresh sense of possibility.

    This group of women and men from different communities, and with nearly 50 years of life between some, welcomed me for the second consecutive year into their space. They offered me their time, ideas, voices, ears, kindness, hugs, and willingness to march together for a future where all of us have access, knowledge, and opportunities to make the choices that will serve our personal and collaborative aims. I feel so honored to have had the opportunity to build on this rich partnership, introducing and tasting new ASK for Choice flavors, and sharing this inspiring and creative environment with the ACER team and our other valuable partners.

    In the final days we made commitments to ourselves and to each other to continue asking ‘Why?’ and to move with clear eyes from the ‘What?’ to the ‘How?’. We played, laughed, danced, discussed, dug deep, reflected, and created. I leave Brazil eager to watch and listen as these leaders bring policies to life in their communities and beyond.

    Obrigada, Diadema! Eu Vou…

  • Redescubriéndonos a Través del Juego

    April 20, 2017. Community Impact Coach, Panchi, reflects on week in Antofagasta, Chile with partners Futbol Mas.

    Desde la experiencia que viví como CIC, y participante de los talleres, considero que ambas organizaciones tienen enfoques similares respecto a los procesos de aprendizaje que se pretenden facilitar, como el conocer nuevos escenarios y salir de tu zona de confort favorece el desarrollo de las personas.

    Plantear el aprendizaje desde el descubrimiento, el desafío, proporcionando  un acompañamiento que impulse, intenta promover y animar al participante a valorar la  aventura,  la experiencia, otorgándole  la confianza  en las propias capacidades  para  enfrentar los obstáculos que se presentan en el camino. Lo más importante de todo,  significar los obstáculos y errores como el tesoro  más preciado dentro de la aventura. Hablamos un mismo lenguaje, nos mueven las mismas cosas y aunque suene cliché, creemos en que podemos construir un mundo mejor. Eso permitió que mi experiencia fuera tan enriquecedora, el poder tomar todo lo nuevo para contribuir a lo que nosotros queremos lograr con nuestra intervención, otorgó un profundo sentido a esta invitación.

    Considero que la forma de trabajo de CAC te entrega la oportunidad de  ir  descubriendo como puedes ser un Coach desde las propias habilidades, como uno puede  apropiar la metodología entregada a sus propias formas  y crear desde ese espacio único y personal. Al comienzo estaba constantemente preguntándome  cuál era la forma correcta, como debo hacerlo, cual es la estructura y pasos, ya que pensaba que existía una sola forma  de intervenir. Luego de observar las dinámicas que se daban en las clases, las diversas alternativas y creaciones que los mismos participantes proponían, me enseñaron a mí que las formas en que uno como coach puede llevar una actividad son infinitas y valiosas.

    Los talleres en Antofagasta fueron increíbles, me sorprende que frente a un mismo estímulo, como lo es un juego, la dinámica durante este y el análisis posterior  puede darse de forma  tan diferente entre un grupo y otro, como se desarrolló por ejemplo en Santiago. Desde las variantes que el mismo grupo de participantes propone, hasta las reflexiones y pensamientos que se comparten en el espacio,   se configura una experiencia única que pertenece a ese grupo humano en particular, lo cual considero simplemente maravilloso. El deporte y juego son herramientas realmente profundas y sabias, las cuales a pesar de  estar presentes  diariamente en lo que hacemos en Fútbol Más jamás me dejarán de sorprender, el clima emocional que generan,  el cómo invitan a participar y a sentirnos cómodos con personas que recién estamos conociendo,  darnos el espacio y la valoración de hacer el ridículo, de reír y mirarnos, con la misma libertad con la que los niños lo hacen permiten una mirada mucho más cercana y empática.

    Cada juego tiene un objetivo, un sentido,  algunos el espacio para agregar variantes e invitar a los participantes a crear, permitiendo inmediatamente establecer  una relación horizontal y de coconstrucción entre el Coach y los participantes. Si una variante propuesta no  funciona, esto se toma como una oportunidad para analizar y realizar preguntas  y así construir aprendizajes más profundos. Dentro de la sesión existen algunas preguntas que pueden orientar respecto a donde queremos llegar con esa conversación,  lo cual no  significa que existan respuestas correctas o incorrectas, pero si un espacio en donde facilitemos el cuestionamiento. Me encanta la flexibilidad de las propuestas, su  simpleza y su  profundidad,  donde definitivamente menos es más.

    Para mí, uno de los aprendizajes más trascendentales  durante  la pasantía  como un CIC  fue redescubrir qué es el juego así como su función simbólica y metáforas lo que permiten la toma de conciencia de nuestro comportamiento,  creencias, emociones y acciones que lo subyacen, brindando la posibilidad de profundizar tanto en nuestros procesos internos como en la contingencia, enmarcado dentro de una vivencia emocionalmente positiva y libre de amenazas.

    Muchas veces como adultos y profesionales podemos identificar diferentes temáticas humanas y sociales que consideramos tan importantes de conversar y poner sobre la mesa, tales como la equidad de género, prevención en el área de la salud sexual e  inmigración entre otras cosas. Cómo tutores tenemos la misión de generar  espacios de discusión, de cuestionamiento, de saber  que es lo que piensan e invitarlos a tener una postura consciente y propia  frente a la realidad del contexto, tanto con las niñas y niños con los que trabajamos como con sus comunidades. En  ocasiones no encontramos las formas que inviten a la participación, ante eso nos  sentimos incómodos,  se nos crea una dificultad   para generar un espacio donde las personas se sientan cómodas y  con la confianza de interactuar,  compartir sus pensamientos en un ambiente de respeto por las diferencias de opinión facilitando un espacio de discusión sano. La metodología de aprendizaje auto dirigido nos abre puertas y posibilidades infinitas.

  • Soccer Sisters

    February 2nd 2017. Blog from partner Soccer Sisters, discussing CAC concepts. 

    How Sports Taught My Son To Solve His Own Problems

    (And Do His Own Homework!)

    My fourth-grade son hasn’t missed a homework assignment in 18+ weeks. Talk about a revolution. That’s 18 weeks and counting without him forgetting a single assignment, log signature, reading, permission slip or long-term project.Nothing short of a miracle. For some context, in the past, labeling him lackadaisical would have been a compliment.

    So what turned him around? Lectures? Bribes? Threats? Nope. He used something called “self-directed learning” from playing games on a soccer field.

    As an advocate for girls and women in sports, I am a big believer in sport for education and this summer our family took a service trip to Armenia with Coaches Across Continents, the world’s largest charity that uses sport for education. The CAC curriculum relies on “self-directed learning,” which means kids play games based on soccer drills that create conflict and the players solve their problems in order to win or play.

    The games were fun, but the message repeated over and over again was simple and genius: “Solve your problems. Solve. Your. Own. Problems.” Not the parent/coach mantra of, “Here, let me help you. Let me show you. Do it this way.” The framework for learning was soccer and fun, but the message was unusual. Most of the time, either on or off the field, we tell our kids what and how to do something and think that is the only way to teach or play.

    When we, as parents, solve our kids’ problems, we are hampering their ability to solve them on their own. In my view, that’s exactly when parents and coaches get tuned out like all the adults in a Charlie Brown cartoon. Remember those? Wah Wah Wah. Blah Blah Blah. Words Words Words. Instead, imagine the fun and challenge of playing games where teams have to move a ball together around a cone with all members of the group touching the ball at the same time but without using their hands or feet. How do you do that? Well, figure it out. Solve your problem.
    It was simple and genius and I am convinced that something about those games on the soccer field clicked for my son. He learned to take care of fourth-grade business. I have been watching his complete turnaround over the last six months. At first, I thought it had to do with just turning ten. Or being in a different classroom.

    But this week, I was convinced it was more than that. He has late soccer on Tuesday nights, getting home at 8:45 p.m., still having to eat dinner and shower. Usually he’s too worn out to read after all that, so he does it beforehand. On the way to soccer I asked him if he had completed all his work, and his 30 minutes of required nightly reading. Surprisingly, he hadn’t.

    Every one of those 18 weeks he got a star sticker for doing all his homework – and he really likes those stickers. I said, “OK. Well, I’m not signing your reading log if you don’t read, so you are just going to have to figure it out.” No signature, no sticker.

    From the back seat came his answer: “This was totally my fault and my responsibility.” I think my eyebrows reached my hairline. He got there on his own and acknowledged that it was his problem to solve. In the bustle of dinner and dishes, I promptly forgot all about it until I went up to his room after washing up. He was in bed, still in his soccer clothes, finishing his reading.

    He’d solved his problem. I felt like the Ponce De Leon of parents. How did this happen? Without me doing anything? Then it hit me. William learned it all on a soccer field – and it was fun.

    I realize that few people have the opportunity to go on a foreign trip with an organization such as CAC, and to learn first-hand the kinds of exercises that focus on “self-directed learning.” But you don’t need a passport and a plane ticket to learn it. So much of it is already ingrained in the culture of sport, in the teambuilding and problem-solving that happens on the pitch at practice every day.

    For William, the message reached him in a way that 1,000 wah, wah, wah morning lectures on responsibility never would and never did.

  • Building the Country of Their Choice

    July 23, 2015. “If you knew me, and you really knew yourself, you would not have killed me.” – Felicien Ntagengwa

    This stark quote greeted us at the Gisozi Genocide Memorial Centre in Kigali. During our last week of training the CAC staff spoke often about the genocide, Rwanda, and it’s future. We wondered about how the genocide was still impacting decisions made today, and whether it was in the daily thoughts of all the citizens. Instead we find ourselves coming to a slightly different conclusion: Rwanda is aware and respectful of its past, but more importantly it is looking to create a future where it does not happen again. In short, Rwanda is building the country they want to become. We see it in the progress being made in capital improvements and in the attitudes of the people moving forward in their daily tasks. Most especially, we see it in the commitment to a singular Rwandan identity instead of the tribal divisions that were a prelude to the genocide.

    This past week in working with over 50 coaches in Kigali we saw how the Rwandan community has moved forward and will continue to become the society they desire. One of the more notable moments of the week occurred Off-Field, in a meeting with the Ministry of Sport and Culture.   They have embraced the ideas put forward by Football for Hope, Peace, and Unity along with CAC to develop a Rwandan specific curriculum that can be implemented by FHPU coaches throughout the country, in the schools and soccer community. This would include games that teach about Rwandan identity, conflict resolution, and understanding stereotyping and discrimination. But they would also include lessons on entrepreneurial skills, leadership, and communication. Along with FHPU, Rwanda has made the choice of what their future should look like, and is able to decide how sport can play a role in educating people about that future. Now, with the help of CAC, we will begin to develop this curriculum with the goal of implementation later this year.

    One game that will be included in this Rwandan curriculum is a game that Victor “Brown” Shyaka created for the final day of training. It was a game of possession between two teams in a large area, but there were also very small squares scattered about that represented safe spaces. Throughout the game, taggers (who represented threats to an individual or community) were released and you had to find a safe space. This game was to teach children about various potential threats and also where and when to seek the safety of places like your home, soccer field, or community center.

    The coaches in Kigali, and throughout Rwanda, are becoming Self-Directed learners, capable of creating their own games and choosing their own future. The coaches, much like the country, is not quite there yet, but you can see the progress they have made and also how close they are to realizing their goals.

    It's been a great month for CAC and FHPU in Rwanda!

    It’s been a great month for CAC and FHPU in Rwanda!