• #BuiltToPlay with ESPN in Sydney

    February 28th 2019. We are delighted to announce our collaboration with ESPN/Disney, and other incredible partners in Sydney, Australia as part of their global Built to Play project.

    Today, Coaches Across Continents were delighted to be present at the official opening of a new, multifunctional sports space in Mount Druitt, Sydney, Australia. The first of its kind that ESPN/Disney has done in Sydney and the eighth Built to Play project globally. The space, built by community volunteers and ESPN and Disney employees, is designed to provide a safe place to play for the surrounding community, as well as offer ongoing programming using the power of sports to educate young people on key local issues. The event included music, special cultural performances, and a ribbon cutting ceremony, followed by a showcase of the programming that will occur onsite. The project is led by ESPN and The Walt Disney Company, in collaboration with Education Outside the Classroom organizations, love.futbol, Coaches Across Continents and PCYC Mt Druitt.

    CAC is proud to be a part of this ESPN/Disney #BuiltToPlay initiative that brings a Love.Fútbol safe space and CAC’s Purposeful Play to PCYC Mt. Druitt to benefit tens of thousands of children and their families for years to come. – Brian Suskiewicz, Chief Executive, CAC

    As well as showcasing CAC’s work during the inauguration, our Chief Executive Brian Suskiewicz will be running a Purposeful Play training program for PCYC coaches, teachers and community leaders over the next 3 days on the new pitches. We will then work closely with the PCYC to implement programming around key social topics identified by them over the next 10 months. Topics include community re-integration, gender equality, conflict prevention, health and substance abuse. The project will also include opportunities for ESPN employees in Sydney to engage with the PCYC, CAC and the community initiative throughout 2019.

    Because of #BuiltToPlay we have the potential ability to further develop our programming regarding youth guidance in education, safety, and core values to another level. – Lance Chaloner, Senior Club Manager at PCYC Mt. Druitt

  • Coaching For Change in Fiji

    November 8th 2016. Recently CAC ran a program with students at Holmesglen University in Melbourne. Since then the students traveled to Fiji to work with children on the island and use the CAC tools they were given. This is an excerpt from their blog about the trip.

    The Coaching for Change Project ran successfully in Fiji from the 17th of October until the 28th of October 2016. The coaching for change project helps the underprivileged Fijian school children learn the importance of sport by running coaching sessions from an array of different sports that they might not have available to them. Coaching for Change also donates a large of sum of equipment to each school they visit. Through the help of Basketball Victoria, Netball Australia, Regan Milstein Foundations, Footy 4 All and Sprite all the equipment that was donated to Coaching for Change was successfully given and handed out to the schools that were visited by Coaching for Change.

    The project met its goals with introducing and successfully running coaching sessions to Fijian school students as well as donating as much equipment as possible to the schools that we attended. Sport has a major social impact on the island. Through sport many social barriers can be broken down. Using the ideas and suggestions of Brain from Coaches Across Continents the language barrier between Australia and Fiji was overcome. Introduction games such as CAC’s Circle of Friends, were also a huge contributor to breaking down the culture barrier by making the school children more comfortable and allowing them to completely express themselves through sport.  Overall the project ran smoothly and the experiences during the unforgettable trip led to a feeling of fulfillment.

    For more on their trip please take a look at this blog.

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  • Impacting Fiji Through Australia (Part 1)

    September 24, 2016.  Fiji is a beautiful country in October, but this story starts much earlier and in a much different place weather-wise.  Melbourne, Australia can be breezy and rainy towards the end of their winter in September.  Despite the changing conditions, a class of students at Holmesglen TAFE University learned both On-Field curriculum and classroom lessons taught by Coaches Across Continents Chief Executive Strategist Brian Suskiewicz.  These students studying Sport Development and Event Management, and in one month they will be traveling to Fiji to work directly with 6 elementary schools through the Fiji Ministry of Education as well as hosting coaching education workshops throughout the country.

    In a unique new partnership, CAC is looking to implement our curriculum and methodology through these Australian students so that they can have a lasting and sustainable impact through their existing partnership with the government of Fiji as well as throughout their budding coaching careers in Australia.

    Over the course of a week, students studied about sustainable impact, the importance of both curriculum delivery and coaching personality, monitoring and evaluation, and the power of sport for social impact among other topics.  Next month, many of these students will leave Australia and get a stamp in their passport for the first time, and see firsthand how their new knowledge and efforts will translate to a new environment with their Pacific neighbor.

    Later this year we will chronicle their efforts in Fiji and have them provide a direct update from their work in the second part of this blog with accompanying pictures.  All of this will be done without direct CAC staffing, highlighting the sustainability that is possible when working in partnerships.  We look forward to how they implement their new knowledge and create lasting and sustainable impact abroad, as well as the impact this trip and partnership has on their own lives.

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  • The Big Issue

    September 19, 2016.  CAC were delighted to run our first ever program in Oceania recently. This one was with the Big Issue Street Soccer Program in Sydney and Melbourne, Australia.

    If you mention “The Big Issue” in Australia, people immediately think of the social enterprise magazine that is sold on street corners as a way to give employment to homeless individuals.  But many people don’t realize that the Big Issue also has a Street Soccer program, running in 19 communities throughout Australia.  Anyone is welcome to join the Big Issue Street Soccer program, and communities have embraced refugees, people with physical and intellectual disabilities, the homeless, and everyone in between.  The sense of community is strong at each site, and they even run weekly programming in two separate prison populations in Victoria.

    During the last two weeks, Coaches Across Continents has worked with Big Issue Street Soccer in Sydney and Melbourne by visiting their sites, working alongside their coaches, and sharing knowledge.  A training course was held in Sydney that attracted other organizations as well as the Big Issue coaches from Newcastle and Canberra.  In Melbourne, a special course was arranged through the Melbourne City in the Community Foundation, where 20+ groups looking to use sport for social impact were in attendance.

    In every instance, the ability to use a curriculum to create social impact during the games was the strongest impact.  The Big Issue offers opportunities and networking by connecting participants to various social support services and providing valuable information, and the CAC curriculum can now be used to enhance that impact, serving nearly 1,000 individuals across Australia.  Coaches now understand how to reinforce the mentoring lessons that are occurring Off-Field while they are coaching On-Field.

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  • 90 Trained Social Impact Coaches in Cambodia’s Capital

    August 26th, 2014. Coaches Across Continents has concluded its second week in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, working in partnership with IndoChina Starfish Foundation (ISF).  ISF is primarily an educational program which runs two schools in the capital serving to accelerate the education of children from nearby slums to a stage where they can be assimilated into the state education system.  It has evolved, however, to provide a more holistic social development role including health and welfare services, outreach work and income/employment enterprise for the children and their families. The organization is funded primarily from Australian benefactors and sponsors, and promotes football for boys and girls as one of the many strands of its education program.
    Coaches Nick, Nora, Francis, Kelly and Graham continued into the second week of the program with around 90 young coaches from ISF and other NGOs based around the capital.  The age of the coaches ranges from 14 to over 40.  Included in the mix of young men and women are a group of 13 coaches from the Deaf Development Program of Cambodia.  These coaches have brought with them an extra and enriching dimension of fun, enjoyment and challenge to the week’s activities.  Focus of the week’s football for social development program has been on gender equality, health and wellness and conflict resolution.  These have been delivered in extremely hot and humid conditions but where the energy of all involved has been high and laughter and play has pervaded right across the field.
    Cambodia is a desperately poor country, with significant numbers of people living in slum communities, particularly in the urban areas.  CAC visited one of the ISF schools and met many of the children in lessons who were fascinated to see on world maps where we had travelled from to be with them.  In turn we were greeted by eager demonstrations of their English language skills and beautiful artwork.   On leaving the school we visited the slums which were home to the children which had only just presented us with drawings and paper flowers.  Most of us had ‘experienced’ slum conditions across other continents, but the conditions in Phnom Penh were as distressing as those we’d seen in Africa and India.  In one community tiny, timber and tin shacks on stilts (to raise above the invested pools of stagnant water and trash below) were built within an abandoned cemetery with tombs all remaining in place.  It was humbling to recall that the great young coaches we have been working with on the field day after day returned to these or similar conditions day after day.
    One particularly inspirational example of the success of ISF has been the development of coach Srey Mau, who began her career as a cleaner at the school but through boundless energy, personality and selflessness has become a key coach in the organization and has embraced the CAC program with great energy and enthusiasm.  In doing so she has stood out as a shining example of the positive work and opportunities ISF and CAC are delivering together.

     

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