• Girls and Women Empowerment At Reclaim Childhood

    September 17, 2019.  CAC Community Impact Coach Marian Dubois from one of our European partners, Fútbol Más France writes about her experience in Jordan.

    Last week, we were in Amman and we worked with the 10 coaches of Reclaim Childhood who lead after school sport programs and summer camp with girls (most of them refugees) in underserved communities in Amman and Zarqa, Jordan. All of them are women who come from the communities they work with.

    During these 4 days of on-field training, the coaches put into practice the learning acquired during all their experience and this third-year CAC program. We played some new games and it was also an opportunity for them to improve their coaching and creation of games. They coached the last two days of the training to external social organization (Right to Play and Collateral Repair Project staff) who were invited for that occasion.

    We also had off-field discussions where topics such as teamwork, self-confidence and also gender equity and the welcoming and integration of refugees were discussed. Some of the games played by the coaches were adapted from their personal experiences, as most of them are also refugees (from Palestine, Iraq, Syria). We had a very relevant conversation about our role as coaches to generate through #PurposefulPlay certain discussions which can provide tools for the girls to overcome trauma and improve their well-being, and how sport for social impact can help to reach the UNSDG 3 “Good health and well-being” and UNSDG 4 “Quality Education”.

    Right after our visit, regular RC programs were going to start again and the coaches showed us, with the on-field practices and off-field discussions, that they will continue their amazing #EducationOutsidetheClassroom work for the empowerment of girls from the most vulnerable communities in Zarqa and Amman. Their work will continue to focus on UNSDG 5 “Gender Equality” and UNSDG 10 “Reduced Inequalities” among the most advantaged and the most vulnerable people, between the refugees and the host community in Jordan.

  • CAC Accredits 2 More Organizations

    September 10, 2019.  Coaches Across Continents is proud to announce two more organizations who have been accredited in Purposeful Play.  GOALS Haiti and Slum Soccer (India) have demonstrated organizational growth and capacity-building through partnership with CAC to create legacies of social change based on the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals through Purposeful Play.  They are being recognized as model organizations within CAC’s global partnership network; a network that covers 60 countries, impacting over 16 million children.  They join ACER (Brasil), GOALS Armenia, and training4changeS (South Africa) as the only CAC Accredited organizations globally.

    80% of CAC’s accredited organizations are shortlisted for the 2019 Beyond Sport Awards

    In January, 2019 Coaches Across Continents launched the world’s first-ever Organizational Accreditation Program in Purposeful Play and Education Outside the Classroom. For accreditation, these groups engaged with their CAC Process Consultants to develop their organizations through our 28 Strategic Resources that include: Creating a Theory of Change Model, Designing a Women’s Rights Policy, Monitoring & Evaluation Process Consultancy, Child and Community-Based Protection Training, and more.  Becoming an accredited organization improves that organizations ability to create sustainable change based on the UNSDGs, find and secure funding and award opportunities, enhance brand reputation, and more.  Accredited partners will receive additional support from Coaches Across Continents including substantial joint-funding opportunities, educational travel and leadership development, global recognition, and high-level networking.

    Slum Soccer has been a CAC-partner since 2011 where they have grown from impacting 500 disadvantaged youth in Nagpur to directly impacting 90,000 youth nationwide. Some of their most recent initiatives involve leading the Education and Sport sector by designing curriculums and programs to teach children about various aspects of Menstrual Health, along with LGBTQI related topics supported by Streetfootballworld’s Common Goal initiative.  Slum Soccer was named the first-ever FIFA For Diversity Award winner in 2016 and are shortlisted this year for a Beyond Sport award in UNSDG#3: Good Health and Well-Being for their Shakti Girls initiative.

    GOALS Haiti advances youth leadership through soccer and education to create stronger, healthier communities in rural Haiti.  They are shortlisted for this year’s Beyond Sport Awards UNSDG#3: Good Health and Well-Being for their Aktive Jèn Yo program that utilizes soccer in Haiti to engage youth and their families in programs that emphasize education, health and the environment to improve their quality of life on a daily basis, and are a prior winner at Beyond Sport (2016).

    Congratulations!

    To learn more about Coaches Across Continents Accreditation Program: Click Here 

    To partner with Coaches Across Continents or support an organizations’ accreditation,

    contact:

  • Creating Child Protection Globally

    September 3, 2019.  CAC has launched a three-month campaign working with our community partners in 60+ countries to create internationally approved Child Protection Policies that are child-, coach-, and organization-friendly.

    • Education: Informing stakeholders based on the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child
    • Child Safe:  Having children understand their rights by playing CAC Purposeful Play games, understanding who they can talk to, and providing services for the child should any breach of their rights occur
    • Coach Safe: Training practitioners on best practices for safe coaching
    • Organization Safe:  Developing procedures and policies that guide the entire organizations, from preventative measures to protect children to reporting procedures if violations occur
    • Community Safe:  Engaging key stakeholders on Child Safety and Protection measures and bringing CAC’s Theory of Change and the communities’ new and improved Child Protection to life

    On Universal Children’s Day, November 20th, the CAC network will celebrate the culture change in global Child Protection that moves communities from simply having a child protection policy document to having communities who have comprehensive and friendly practices engaging all stakeholders to protect children as part of CAC’s Community Empowerment to Ensure All Human Rights.

    We are proud that CAC is leading Child Protection globally.”

    – Nick Gates, CAC Founder

    CAC is a pioneering member for the International Safeguards for Children in Sport, has published papers on Child Protection and Peace and Child Rights, is on three UNICEF working groups for Child Protection, and is currently working with governments and NGOs on 6 continents to develop stronger child protection policies, procedures, and cultures.

  • Partnerships for the GOALS

    The CAC team have been in Armenia this last week, working in Partnership with the Kansas National Guard and GOALS Armenia. Using our #PurposefulPlay curriculum, we delivered a 3 day summer camp high up on the beautiful mountains of Yenokavan, in Northern Armenia for local children of military families. Our Goal for this was to focus on UNSDG #5 Gender Equality whilst also introducing #EducationOutsideTheClassroom to young people who had never experienced it before. There were 44 children in attendance with an ideal 50/50 split of girls and boys.

    The summer camp was a lot of fun and using the amazing story of Brazilian international football player and role model Marta, we were able to have in-depth conversations about the harmful impact of gender roles and we also had discussions about how we can be more inclusive in our schools and communities.

    The brilliant GOALS Armenia facilitators played many games from our ASK For Choice curriculum, creating fun and safe environment where the participants could share their thoughts and feelings. We also introduced a lot of team-building activities, with one participant stating “I made many friends thanks to this camp and have gained a lot of skills like how to build my confidence and work as a team.”

    The Kansas National Guard were also a major part of this camp – the 4 officers played a game with the children so they could learn more about life in the army in America, and also through this game their stereotypes were challenged when they learned the officer ‘in charge’ was the female officer. A special thanks to Major Solander for not only playing a major part in helping make this camp possible, but for sharing her inspiring story of being a female in the military and the challenges she faced.

    This camp was a massive success, mostly down to the fact we had three organisations, from different countries and different backgrounds, coming together to put on a world class camp for the children and young people of Armenia. This was UNSDG #17 in action.

  • The Right to Purposeful Play in Malawi

    CAC Global Citizen Libbie Randolph writes about her final week with CAC in Lilongwe, Malawi.
    In Chichewa, the local language in Lilongwe, Malawi, Kusewera means ‘to play.’ I could not think of a more fitting name for the partner organization that we worked with in Malawi this week. Every afternoon around 2pm, the sounds of children laughing, swinging, running, and bouncing balls filled Kusewera Village. In addition to the visible joy that the facilities brought to these children, our on-field sessions and off-field discussions proved how dedicated the Kusewera team is to advocating for children’s right to play and learning through #EducationOutsideoftheClassroom. During our week-long program, we focused primarily on UNSDG 4, Quality Education, and UNSDG 5, Gender Equality, as well as child rights. On-field, many of the 35 games that we played sparked discussions about how we, as coaches and educators, can advocate for and protect children’s rights in our community, such as the right to play. We also played games that lead to conversations about how empowering women and girls in the community and the workplace benefits not only women, but the whole society. By the end of the week, the participants were all enthusiastic about using the CAC curriculum and games to implement #PurposefulPlay in Kusewera programming for the local community.
    I could not have asked for a better program to conclude my time as a Global Citizen with CAC. Although I wish I had more time, I’m leaving Malawi having learned so much from the Kusewera educators and the community. From teaching us songs and dances to sharing nsima with us during lunchtime, the Kuswera community has been more than welcoming from the moment we arrived. Despite it being the first time that CAC has partnered with Kusewera, the discussions that we had assured me that the educators prioritize the children in their community. The statement, “Change starts with us,” was repeated often throughout the week, and it is very apparent that the educators and coaches believe that. At the end of the week, the local program leader, Jordan, thanked us and said, “Before working with CAC, we would just provide the balls and equipment for the children to play. Now, we are more aware and prepared as educators to participate in the play and make it more meaningful.” To me, that statement captures the essence of what CAC strives for through the goals of #EducationOutsideoftheClassroom and #PurposefulPlay.”
  • A Programme That Packed SWAGA

    This week, we worked with Sports with a Goal Africa (SWAGA) in Mogotio, Kenya. Although we had an abbreviated program, we played a total of 22 games that reinforced #EducationOutsideoftheClassroom and #PurposefulPlay through on-field training sessions, game reviews, game creation, and off-field discussions. Most of the games focused on two UNSDGs, UNSDG 5 – Gender Equality and UNSDG 10 – Reduced Inequality. We also had an impactful discussion about Child Rights and debated local opinions about corporal punishment. This discussion concluded with a Child Rights Policy that each participant signed, which outlined how they, as teachers and coaches, can help to protect the rights of children in their communities.
    We spent a total of 3 days on-field with SWAGA participants, most of them were teachers in the girls’ boarding high school where the training was taking place, Kimng’orom Girls Secondary School. It was a positive opportunity for the pupils to see their teachers learning new games and wonderful to see the teachers engaging the students and coaching the games that they had learned. I feel that Kimng’orom is in a good position to impact the lives of the community around it through #PurposefulPlay since now we have worked with many of the teachers to share knowledge about sports for social impact.