• #CAC10: Celebrating Our 1st Decade

    August 31, 2018.  Founder Nick Gates reflects on a decade of CAC.

    It seems just like yesterday when Coaches Across Continents came to life.  I was on a local bus in East Africa when I had the idea on how to best support local communities.  A lot has changed since our first and only program in 2008 in rural Kigoma, Tanzania.  We started as a traditional, ‘train the trainer’ model, but we have evolved to provide year-round process consultancy to organizations in more than 56 countries. We have 3 key partnership pathways and 28 strategic resources for corporations, communities, governments, and foundations to implement our Education Outside the Classroom and create legacies of social change.

    Coaches Across Continents has become the global leader in Education Outside the Classroom.  Our published Self-Directed Learning methodology and Chance to Choice and ASK for Choice curriculum pathways has been requested by organizations in nearly 100 countries and impacts over 16 million children annually.

    In the past decade our innovative programs, partnerships, and projects have been recognized with 25 major global awards. Currently we are shortlisted for Beyond Sport’s Global Impact of the Year Award with the winner announced in New York City on September 12th.

    Our Corporate and Foundation Legacy Program Designs, Develops, and Implements specific CSR and Cause Marketing Initiatives, with successful CSR projects in 23 countries including Olympic and World Cup Legacies, while our Government and Community Legacy Program uses our 28 strategic resources and creates Education Outside the Classroom to address 10 of the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

    Organizations such as the Asian Football Confederation have named Coaches Across Continents their Social Responsibility Partner, while corporations like Nike, Chevrolet, Bloomberg, Standard Chartered Bank, and more have used CAC to bring their CSR initiatives to life.  And foundations like the Michael Johnson Young Leaders Program rely on CAC to help implement their vision to create and educate dynamic young leaders around the world.

    Over the past decade we have worked with over 430 different community organizations, including 12 of the FIFA Football for Hope Centers and nearly 50 different Street Football World partners.  Through partnership with CAC, they have gone through organizational transformation and development using our strategic resources to best deliver Education Outside the Classroom in their communities.  This year seven of our partners are also shortlisted for various Beyond Sport Awards.

    Our success is only possible because of hundreds of committed individuals.  I would like to thank our Board of Directors, Business Advisory Team, ASK for Choice Advisory Team, and Coach Advisory Team.  We also want to give a special thanks to all our global citizens and supporters, our Community Impact Coaches, all our donors, our videographer Kevin O’Donovan, and the Taiji Brand Group for helping us create sustainable legacies all over the world.

    This month, we celebrate our ten-year anniversary under the campaign #CAC10.  It’s been a decade of excellence.

    #WhatsYourLegacy?

    Nick Gates

    Founder and Global Strategist

  • Not About the Ball

    August 21st, 2018. Community Impact Coach, Robelyn Villas, writes about the experience of working with Coaches Across Continents On-Field in the Philippines with CAC Community Partner, Gawad Kalinga, after the already exciting adventure of the FIFA Football for Hope Festival in Russia this Summer of 2018 in partnership with the World Cup! 

    To have another journey after becoming part of the Philippine delegation for Russia (FIFA Football For Hope Festival) was unanticipated until Coaches Across Continents selected me to be part of their training seminar, both as a participant and a facilitator.

    It was on July 28 when my colleague Coach John Paul and I, Coach Robelyn Villas, joined CAC Coaches Charlie and volunteer coach, Patty, in Giussepe F.C. – Campo, Cebu to be one of their participants. It was a two-day affair and we immediately jumped into their football drills and sessions. Among the sessions that we participated in were the Children’s Packet drill which promotes intercultural cooperation.

    The drills in Cebu that I participated in were also a chance for us to share and learn in teaching football as a social development platform, also as a tool to engage individuals in social issues arising from their localities and help them understand how to approach those issues.

    After the weekend seminar in Cebu City (July 28-29), we headed to Sagay City in Negros Occidental to join Coach Charlie and CAC as team-members in their 5-day seminar titled: “COACHES ACROSS CONTINENTS – Global Leaders in Sports for Social Impact.” For almost a  week (July 30-August 3), JP and I, led activities for the participants who were teachers, government employees and humanitarian volunteers from Gawad Kalinga’s SipaG Football Club.

    The activity that captivated me the most was a HIV and Sexual Health drill. The aim is to spread sexual health awareness among the participants since the growth rate in the Philippines for HIV is very alarming. The continuous widespread of HIV in our country should be taken seriously.

    It’s not just the drills and activities that inspired me so much during the CAC seminar, but also the wonderful city of Sagay, Negros Occidental wherein CAC held it’s event. The calm and pleasant ambience of the city is relaxing and so comfortable that it made you want to live there.

    Besides experiencing the tranquil ambience in Sagay, we were also able to witness one AFC (Asian Football Confederation) match in Bacolod City. The match was between top football clubs from their respective leagues, Ceres-Negros FC of the Philippines and Home United of Singapore. It was great to witness this kind of match among the top clubs in Southeast Asia, especially seeing it personally. The match ended with a draw (1-1).

    Overall, Coaches Across Continents helped me enhance my skills as a coach and I was able to have a fantastic opportunity to participate and facilitate drills that tackle social awareness and development. The 7 day seminar also guided me to become a more responsible coach and mentor. Teaching football shouldn’t only be about kicking the ball, but also instilling social responsibilities for us to be the catalyst of positive social change through Education Outside the Classroom.

  • Global Impact of the Year Award Shortlist: Beyond Sport

    July 24, 2018.  Coaches Across Continents #WhatsYourLegacy? was officially shortlisted for the Global Impact of the Year Award by Beyond Sport.  Selected from over 400 applications, from 100+ countries and covering 53 sports, the shortlist recognizes the standout work of organizations who are creating positive social impact in communities around the world through sport.  On September 12, representatives of each of the organizations will attend the 10thannual Beyond Sport Global Awards ceremony at One World Observatory at One World Trade, where the winners of each category will be announced.

    Coaches Across Continents is the Global Leader in Education Outside the Classroom. Additionally, we are the only global NGO providing year-round process consultancy resources to partners. By using our Self-Directed Learning methodology, CAC mentors organizations through our Hat-Trick Initiative to create legacies of positive social change based on the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

    Through our dedicated process consultancy, Coaches Across Continents has worked with Corporations, Governments, Foundations, and Community Based organizations in 56 countries to Design, Develop, and Implement Sustainable Legacies of positive change through Sport for Social Impact.

    Our work and expertise has been recognized through 24 major global awards, invitations for countless international presentations and annual keynote speeches, published methodology, and CSR work in 23 countries for corporations and foundations.

    Our work has impacts over 16 million children annually, and our Corporate Partnership Legacy Program influences 100,000,000+ consumers. In addition to our work with Corporations and Foundation, CAC is also the Official Social Responsibility Partner of the Asian Football Confederation.

    2018 marks Coaches Across Continents’ 10-year anniversary, and this week CAC Founder Nick Gates is in Kigoma, Tanzania to celebrate.

    #CAC10
    #WhatsYourLegacy?

  • Education Outside the Classroom in the “No-Law Zone”

    April 12th, 2018. Self-Directed Learning Educator, Jordan Stephenson, writes about his second visit to Lebanon working with Corporate Partner ANERA (American Near East Refugee Aid). 

    Arriving in Lebanon for my second time representing Coaches Across Continents was a great thrill. Having experienced the hustle and bustle of Beirut previously and worked with some incredible people with our partner Anera (America Near East Refugee Aid), it was now time to work with the local NGO’s which Anera support.

    We are delivering Life Skills training to teachers working in refugee communities. The programme works with youth aged 14-24 years old who have not been in education for more than 2 years. Our Education Outside the Classroom methodology is allowing more young people to access vital skills relating to employment [even though it’s virtually impossible to get a job anyway if you’re Palestinian or Syrian] and becoming a better citizen.

    Most of the teachers are living and working in the Ein el Helwe refugee camp. It is the largest refugee camp in Lebanon with over 120,000 people. It has high media presence because of gun violence and death rate due to the lack of Lebanese authority. It is known as the “no-law zone” because Lebanese police have no jurisdiction in the camp and therefore the community runs themselves.

    The training brought to life our curriculum as well as giving me a greater understanding to the challenges which people face here, both whilst using Education Outside the Classroom and in their lives. We have two more weeks of training in different locations across the country and I am excited to continue to spread the community legacies which Coaches Across Continents are involved in!

  • Blog 1 – Culture Shock

    April 11, 2018. Global Citizen, Abigale Gibbons, writes about her first time on-field with Coaches Across Continents while working with Fútbol Más Chile

    Before my departure to Chile and Peru as a Global Citizen, I had no idea what to expect. I have a passion for sport and using it for social impact—which is the reason I was initially captivated by Coaches Across Continents, conversational Spanish (more or less) and was waiting to see where the following weeks would take me.

    The first training was an eye opening and learning experience for me. The opportunity to finally work on an all female team, especially in the space of athletics, was (and is) an incredibly empowering feeling. I took the initial days to learn and absorb the process and planning it takes to host a training. (If you think hosting a training is easy, think again.) It takes a lot of research, intuition and understanding to properly run each session and it was certainly more intense than I imagined it to be. After hours of preparation, I was excited to see how all of the work off-field would play out on field.

    The first city we landed in was Iquique—a beautiful town with a beach that resembles Rio de Janeiro or the California coast on one side and blissful mountain deserts on the other. In Iquique and all throughout Chile, we would be working alongside CAC partner Fútbol Màs, a global organization that uses sport in communities to recover public places and create safe spaces for children to train and grow.

    For me personally, this first training was amazing, challenging and overwhelming all at the same time. After being so adjusted to my life in the States, the reality that I was now an outsider—who couldn’t properly communicate or understand the local language—quickly led me to begin to think differently, become more aware of those around me, have greater empathy and change my previous perspectives of what life is like for a foreigner living in a new culture, city, country and community.

    One of my greatest takeaways from this first training was how grateful I was to be welcomed, as a stranger, into the lives and communities of the participants and Fútbol Màs. I began to develop a clearer understanding that we are all humans who want to help each other, learn from each other and better our communities by encouraging new ideas and evolution from tradition.

     

     

  • The Rose That Grew From Concrete

    December 14th, 2017. Self-Directed Learning Educator, Mark Gabriel, writes about his personal reflections from the week on-field in Hpa an, Myanmar with Football United

    The Rose That Grew From Concrete  named accredited to Tupac Amaru Shakur

    My friend’s dad once told me, “You never know the impact you have on people. Something you do now could impact them forever. You won’t know it and maybe even they won’t know it. Just live it, be it, and have faith.” These words have helped me understand my role as a Self-Directed Learning Coach and Process Consultant with CAC. I do this work because I believe that, by empowering community leaders to challenge the status quo and ask themselves, “Why do I believe what I believe?”, they are able to be the master of their ways. To make sure that any changes in mentality and behavior come from within the community, we as CAC only stay in each location for one week (and continue the year-round partnership from afar). I have oftentimes been asked if I really think anything can happen in just one week On-Field. My answer — yes. This approach allows for the community leaders to be the catalysts of change rather than looking at us to be. The only thing is… if there is change, I probably won’t see it. Change takes time, and that goes for anything. If you want to lose weight, or learn how to meditate, it takes time. And those changes only have to do with you! Imagine when it involves an entire community. Or an entire culture and belief system. Yea… it can take a while.
    But we are not here to be the change. We are not here to see the change. We are here to spark the change. As a Self-Directed Learning Coach, we constantly challenge ourselves and our participants to self-reflect. This in and of itself can be life-changing for many (it sure has been for me). Questioning oneself, one’s beliefs, one’s culture, one’s existence, is not a frequented practice, but yet its power is incomparable. Each program is unique in its own right, as are the participants. However, the impact of having them ask themselves the “Why?” behind aspects of their life stays consistent. Many a time, it is a first for participants to do such a practice.

    This week in Hpa-An, it felt much the same. Our participants ranged from players to students to coaches to wannabe coaches, and all were confident in their culture and how life goes in Hpa-An. As they should be! Who knows life in Hpa-An better than them? But once we challenged to think about life itself, and not just in the context of their home, the gears began to spin. Having them question when to award a team a point (do you award the team that finishes first or the team that does it right? Why?), the importance of competition, who can/cannot play sports, what are the differences between man and woman; these questions transcend any cultural norms but find people answer through their own perspective, influenced by their upbringing. Even as a facilitator of these programs, I still find myself falling back to my own culture to paint a picture of the world. Each program I lead, I find myself being challenged more and more to break my tainted perception. This shows us how much our nurture impacts our views on the world. Such realizations and the following inter-personal reflections are what will lead to change.

    As of right now, what will become of Football United in Hpa-An is a bit unclear as it is in the beginning stages. It would be easy to be discouraged by the lack of “impact” when looking at sheer numbers of trainings, numbers of coaches, number of players worked with, etc. But impact is much more than these quantitative measures. If our training led to one participant challenging her or hisself, the potential impact is limitless. Maybe I won’t be the change, or see the change, but maybe I hear of the change. One day.

    Did you hear about the rose that grew from a crack in the concrete? Proving nature’s law is wrong it learned to walk without having feet. Funny it seems, but by keeping its dreams, it learned to breathe fresh air. Long live the rose that grew from concrete when no one else ever cared.”

    — Tupac Amaru Shakur